360t Overhead Crane Transferred by Sarens in Dunkerque, France

360t Overhead Crane Transferred by Sarens in Dunkerque, France

SPMTs and climbing systems lead to successful lift. Photograph - Sarens

Date 11 January 2019

Sarens recently transferred a 360-tonne, 36-metre long overhead crane on behalf of client ArcelorMittal in Dunkerque, France. The crane had to be placed in a new location at the steel manufacturing plant (from inside to outside of a specific hall).

To do it, the Sarens crew mobilised the following SPMTs and climbing systems: 

  • 2 x 12 axle Kamag SPMTs
  • CS1000 & CS250 climbing systems
  • Bracing 14m steel mats HEM300
  • Forklifts and cherry-pickers 

Sarens opted for the CS1000 climbing system because although it was larger than required, it wouldn't need a bracing system. The crew used both the CS1000 and CS250 to successfully manoeuvre through the opening prepared by the client, as Kris Nuyts, Manager SPMT Operations, and Laurent Ziegler, Sarens in France explain: 

"Due to the size of the opening leading from inside to outside of the hall, transferring the overhead crane required an intermediate step involving the CS250. This was a challenge, but it was executed smoothly by our skilled team." 

The project commenced during a brief plant shut-down and required several steps: 

  1. The CS1000 was assembled onto SPMTs and jacked 200mm to avoid contact with the rails.
  2. The CS1000 picked up the overhead crane inside the hall, rotated the load 90°, and lowered it onto the waiting CS250.
  3. The CS1000 and SPMTs were then transferred outside of the hall, where the CS1000 was temporarily unloaded.
  4. The SPMTs were brought back inside the hall to pick up the overhead crane using the hydraulic system. They then transferred the overhead crane outside the hall, along with the CS250.
  5. Outside the hall, the CS250 was re-installed and positioned to remove the SPMTs. The CS1000 was assembled back onto the SPMTs.
  6. The CS1000 then picked up the overhead crane and jacked it to its intended height.
  7. The overhead crane was correctly positioned and the SPMTs lowered to release it onto the rails. 

Sarens would like to thank everyone involved in this successful operation! It takes skill and care to perform lifts like these consistently and safely, day in and day out.

Source Sarens


Liked this post?

Please, give the poster some credit for his/her efforts.

Comments

No comments, yet

{{item.nick}}{{item.tstamp|unixtime}}{{item.credit}}

{{item.content}}

Login

Add Comment